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Author: Tom Corsellis
Location: Worldwide
Channel Type: Thematic
This collection of guidance, standards and training materials is intended to support the planning and management of open camps established in response to both natural disasters and complex emergencies, understanding that camps should be established only as part of a comprehensive shelter and settlement strategy, involving explorations of alternatives to camps.
Shelter in Urban Emergencies is a RedR UK training event in conjuction with LLoyds trust. The aim of the training is to bring together experienced Shelter humanitarians as presenters and participants to explore and develop the necessary skills and knowledge to effectively work in the early stages of an urban emergency. Aid agencies have struggled to effectively respond recent urban emergencies. One of the main gaps of response is a lack of Shelter experts with urban response expertise. An urban emergency is much more complex than many rural or camp-focused emergencies. The kind of response required is greatly affected by the type of disaster and the different urban environments, whether huge cities; medium sized towns; peri-urban or slum areas. Aid agencies are much less significant players in urban responses, as their available resources are often dwarfed by those of existing service providers. It is crucial for effective urban disaster response to build strong relations with national and municipal authorities as well as private sector service suppliers, and to work within existing legislation and long term plans for the cities. Working with communities is as important as ever, but communities are less tightly defined and engagement becomes more complex: communities are unlikely to be geographically-identified but instead based around common interests or, for instance, income opportunities. Typical emergency Shelter responses are often inappropriate in urban areas: local authorities and existing infrastructure must be respected; camp setups are not always an appropriate solution or physically possible as space is limited and land ownership disputed.
Sector(s): Education
Author: rafiei_jafar
Location:
Channel Type: Training
master of cimatology
Author: Louis Vine
Location: Iraq
Channel Type:
This channel is a growing resource focusing on the use of abandoned and unfinished buildings in Iraq. Photo: Bethany Williams, Medair.
Author: Louis Vine
Location: Iraq
Channel Type:
Keywords: Iraq, shelter, WASH, CCCM
This channel is a working project aimed at developing a prioritisation tool for resource distribution in Iraq.
Author: Louis Vine
Location: Iraq
Channel Type:
A collection of resources relating to Iraq CCCM NFIs.
Author: Louis Vine
Location: Iraq
Channel Type:
Keywords: WASH, Iraq, NFIs
This channel is a collection of WASH NFIs resources relating to Iraq.
Author: Louis Vine
Location: Iraq
Channel Type:
Keywords: Iraq, housing, NFIs, shelter
This channel aims to bring together resources relating to Shelter and Housing NFIs in Iraq. It also draws on other responses to give a wider range of resources.
Author: Louis Vine
Location: Iraq
Channel Type: Operation
Keywords: Iraq, housing, shelter
This channel attempts to bring together resources related to housing and shelter in Iraq with the view to assist in the current humanitarian crisis unfolding in the country.
Author: Louis Vine
Location: London
Channel Type:
This channel attempts to bring together resources focused on rental support and cash programming.
Author: Dominic Courage
Location:
Channel Type:
Collection of documents relevant to SC programming
Author: Amanda Wigfall
Location: World
Channel Type: Training
Keywords: shelter
NRC shelter programmes include non-physical and physical construction shelter support. Non-physical shelter support describes rental and host families support. Physical construction shelter support refers to the four options for building back better, which are retrofit, repair, rebuild and relocate, as well as to maintenance, tents and transitional shelter.
Author: Amanda Wigfall
Location: World
Channel Type: Training
In this Handbook, the word ‘settlement’ is used with two meanings. The first meaning is places where people live, the community’s area. The second meaning is how the affected population settles after a natural disaster, armed conflict or complex emergency. This second meaning of the word settlement is used in the 6+6 settlement options section. Shelter solutions that the affected populations are provided with will meet their basic needs if their settlements have the capacity to ensure the well-functioning of these shelter solutions in terms of infrastructure, resilience and governance.
Author: Amanda Wigfall
Location:
Channel Type: Training
NRC operates in complex, violent and often marginal environments and it generates different needs and risks for different groups or individuals. In order to ensure high quality relevant programming NRC will always assess the crosscutting issues and incorporate a programmatic response where required. Being considered as a whole, crosscutting issues provide a series of important points to stakeholders to deal with programmatic response. In parallel, programmatic response needs to present a real understanding of the situation by identifying and addressing the key issues in an integrated manner and communicating continually with other sectors.
Author: Amanda Wigfall
Location: World
Channel Type: Training
NRC understands there to be 18 shelter assistance methods that are normally combined to support the affected population, depending upon the nature of the shelter or settlement programme. Most of these are commonly used by NRC shelter programmes while some, such as loans and credit, are generally outside our standard capacity but can be considered, if the context requires. The 18 assistance methods are summarised below and then elaborated further in this chapter. Case study examples are offered, in order to illustrate how past responses can be understood using the 18 methods. Although the details of how each assistance method is used in each project will vary, the values of using a comprehensive and consistent description include improving communication between stakeholders, as well as making more visible lessons learnt from previous projects.
Author: Amanda Wigfall
Location:
Channel Type: Training
NRC intervenes when people are unable to exercise their right to shelter. This is usually in the context of displacement due to conflict, but NRC also responds to natural disaster displacement (normally defined by whether there is already an NRC presence in the country due to conflict-based displacement) and has projects in ‘non-crisis’ situations (e.g. voluntary returns).
Author: Amanda Wigfall
Location: World
Channel Type: References
Keywords: intervention types
This chapter covers the topics that frame the NRC staff actions during shelter interventions. During shelter interventions the NRC staff has to act in accordance with NRC shelter policy and principles recognised by IASC clusters. The assistance provided to IDPs and refugees should be in accordance with internationally recognised standards and codes for shelter and other types of humanitarian assistance. The international humanitarian response coordination is necessary to ensure a coherent response to emergencies, which is the reason why the three main coordination responses are described in this chapter. Shelter-interventions need to take in account the multi-level legal context, which includes the internationally recognised right to shelter or to adequate housing, national legislation and in some cases customary law. Through advocacy, which is based on the NRC’s staff knowledge of legal context and broader situation on the ground, NRC’s country offices are able to improve the protection of the displaced people. NRC has a strong partnership with UNHCR, when working with UNHCR NRC may be asked or required to use UNHCR procedures.
Author: Amanda Wigfall
Location:
Channel Type:
This web-book replaces the Shelter Handbook and has been produced as a guide to support NRC field and headquarters staff in shelter programming. It contains material on NRC shelter principles, theory and practical tools. Cross-overs with other NRC core competences are identified as well as different approaches to the provision of emergency, transitional and permanent shelter. This web-book is not a technical construction manual and, instead of describing all issues in detail, provides links to the best resources from NRC country programmes and the wider shelter sector. From revision v2.0 the Shelter web-book no longer covers general project cycle management beyond its shelter-specific aspects. There will be a dedicated NRC resource for project management across the Core Competencies. At time of writing this does not yet exist, and so relevant parts of NRC Shelter Handbook v1.0 may remain useful in the interim.
In order to bring disaster preparedness and DRR as a mainstream topic a 3 acre park in the historic town of Kot Diji, Upper Sindh, is being transformed into DRR Training Park, where demonstration and training pavilions are being constructed for integrated disaster preparedness approaches, along with emphasis on traditional alternative livelihoods to deal with issues of vulnerability. The park will be available for experimentation related to DRR aspects as well as trainings (a few 3-D views attached).
Over the past few years many of us have worked closely together to deliver relief and recovery assistance to some of the most vulnerable people in Pakistan affected by floods, earthquake and conflict. The list of projects is extensive, the sectors covered are numerous, and most importantly the number of people reached is very high, as much as 6 million people since 2011. Beyond the funds spent and the beneficiaries reached we have constantly asked for more information on outputs, outcomes, impact. We have pressed our partners to achieve more meaningful services for less money, thus increasing coverage while maintaining a high standard of service, or if possible improving upon the standard humanitarian package. We believe that there have been some impressive results over these years; yet we recognise that there have also been areas which could benefit from serious re-thinking and improvement. At this juncture, we’d like to share some of our findings, examples of innovation, good “value for money” and opportunities to improve the way we do humanitarian aid. Many of us have worked hard on these issues over the past few years; through practice, we have been able to transform certain parts of the humanitarian enterprise. The humanitarian landscape is changing – there are more people affected by climate and conflict driven disasters across the world and yet increasingly less funding available overall. We are going to have to learn to do more with less. With all this in mind, we are looking to build a new strategy for response. We are designing our potential humanitarian response over the next four years. We would like to invite you to this workshop to share our ideas of how we might engage with the different predictable and un-predictable shocks that may occur and to seek your inputs, ideas and feedback. We are not immune to budget reductions, nor to the reality that spiraling crises elsewhere in the world that put increasing pressure on limited donor funds - reinforcing the need for more efficiency in the design of our response.

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